Debunking a Common Marketing Myth


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Debunking a Common Marketing Myth

Show Notes

  • Some people believe that the less information you ask for in an opt-in, the better conversion rate you will have.
  • This common marketing myth would have you believe that there are no other leverage points you can use to get more contact information from potential clients.
  • We know there are many ways we can get people to identify themselves from using pixels to text messaging.
  • The best lever to work on is the lever that no one talks about because it requires more work.
  • When you fail to connect with people you reduce the amount of information you try to get from people.
  • Short-term money is a lifestyle, not a business solution.
  • It is much more work to build a business that engages with people.
  • You only have a limited number of days on this earth and while you are here you need to provide for yourself and possibly a family. You need to create something that is valuable to people.
  • Ask yourself, "What am I doing to create value for the marketplace? Am I going to engage in a business that offers long-term value or will I work with a constant flux of new people?"
  • Ryan prefers working with a smaller number of people over a longer time period as it is more manageable, and he can help people on a deeper level.
  • There is more profit and enjoyment in helping people long-term versus short-term.
  • In your lead capture, the amount of information that you can ask for is directly proportional to the motivation of the prospect you are asking the information from. The more they believe you can help them with their problem, the more information they will be willing to give you.
  • If you are in a situation where you are trying to increase your conversion, ask yourself, "Am I actually solving a problem they are trying to solve and are they willing to spend money to solve it?
  • Spend your time building a business that will move the dial for people and bring about the change they want. The results:
  • You will feel more fulfilled
  • Make more money
  • Have happier customers
  • Establish long-term customers
  • Check out our "Claim Your Life Back" event to help you find a business that will fulfill your needs as well as your customers’ needs.
  • Text CLAIM to (760) 621-8199 to get more information about the "Claim Your Life Back" event.

Transcription of Episode

[00:00:00] Hello, this is Ryan Chapman with Fix Your Funnel, and in today's episode, I'm going to be addressing a marketing myth that's been out there for a long time, It's one that I hate when I hear it, mostly because it's total garbage and it causes businesses to make stupid decisions that paint them into corners have I made myself clear that I'm not a big fan of this myth? The myth is that the less information you ask, the better conversion you're going to get on your squeeze page, opt-in, or whatever thing you're trying to get people's contact information from.

On the surface, you may look at that and say, Ryan, how can that be a myth? I've heard it from very many credible sources that, the less information I ask, the better conversion I'll get. While that isn't totally a lie, that can be a statement that can be verified, the focus and the premise of the whole thing is what I can test and what I say is the real myth.

That premise is that there's no other leverage points in order for you [00:01:00] to move, in order to get people to give you more information. Since I can't move any other levers, the only lever I should move is decrease in the information or contact information I'm asking from a prospective customer in order for me to get them to identify themselves.

If you've been listening to this podcast for very long, then you know that there's a whole host of other ways that we can get people to identify themselves, from pixeling, to text messaging, to whatever, but the idea that your only choice if you want to increase conversions is to ask for less information is built on this false idea that that is the only lever that you have to work.

Here's what I'm going to propose to you: that actually, the best lever to work on is the lever that nobody talks about because it actually involves a little bit more work. However, that work pays off in droves. It is kind of the basis for a lot of the conversation we've had in this podcast today, which is about connecting with people instead of just trying to get their money.

When you fail to connect with people and you just try to get their money, then you [00:02:00] usually go for shortcuts like reducing the amount of information you ask to get more conversion. While there's totally a play for that, and there's a very big case to be made for that in terms of getting short term money, I personally have never been interested in short-term money.

Short-term money is a lifestyle, it's not actually a business solution. Short term money means that you're constantly having to sell because you're never keeping people as customers long-term. It builds a business that is way more work than a business that connects with people and engages in long-term customer relationships.

The reason that this is an important topic, and I want to get into this a little deeper before we go into the actual question we're answering here, is you only have a limited number of days on this earth. That's not a reality a lot of people like to focus on or talk about, but the reality is you only have a fixed period of time on this earth. I don't know what it is, and you don't know what it is, but it [00:03:00] is a fixed period of time, it is not infinite.

At some point you will leave the planet. While you're on this planet, one of the realities of life is you must provide for yourself. And if you have a family, you have an obligation to provide for them. Providing means that you must find a way to create value that you can exchange with the marketplace, which means you have to create something that is of value to other people to the point that they would give money for it.

If you do that, you can suddenly provide for yourself. If you don't do that, you won't provide for yourself. You'll have to rely upon other people, which is a terrible place to be in, and it's also an irresponsible place to be in if you have the capacity to provide.

That being the case, then we have to go a little bit deeper and we have to think about, okay, so here I am, I have a limited number of days, I have to provide, what am I doing to create value for the marketplace? You get to make that choice, you get to make that decision.

Whether that decision involves getting an education to change what it is [00:04:00] that you offer to the marketplace, or if you already have that education and making a decision to change what you offer to the marketplace, that is still totally within your power. Because that's within your power, the question you have to ask yourself is, am I going to engage in a business that creates long-term value? Or is it a constant flux of people?

Personally, I know it's a personal choice, some people may love the constant flood of new people having to come through their business because they have to constantly be selling in order to stay in business, I personally love to have a smaller number of people that I work with over a longer period of time because I think it's more manageable. You can actually get deeper in terms of helping people, and it's more fun.

So, given the choice, I choose the latter. I personally would encourage you to choose latter, because there's a lot more profit and a lot more enjoyment in being able to help people over a long term versus short term. It doesn't mean that you won't help people in the short term, but it means that people will want to work with you over a [00:05:00] long period of time.

That's a different type of business, and that's the type of business I hope that you're engaged in. If not, think about how you can start changing your business to be that way.

This brings us back to the question, how do I know how much information I should ask in my marketing? In your lead capture, the amount of information that you can ask for is directly proportional to the motivation of the prospect you are asking the information from.

The more that they believe that you can actually help them with their problem, the more information they will be willing to give you.

Here's a case and point: one of the early businesses I had, once I learned all my lessons that I needed to learn about marketing and business in terms of the initial lessons, we're always going to be learning, but once I had gone through my first primary education and started having success in business, we were running a business that would actually collect name, phone number, fax, email, mailing address, and businesses they were associated with in order for them to [00:06:00] be able to register for a place where we would give them education.

Because the motivation was placed properly, and because we built the case that we had something that they really would need and want and would solve a problem that they had in their life, then the motivation was high enough that they were willing to give us all that information.

And guess what? They didn't give us bogus information. They didn't give us bogus email addresses. They didn't give us bogus phone numbers. They give us real information. And the reason why is because the motivation was high.

Now, if you're in a situation where you're trying to increase your conversion, first I'd ask you, are you hitting the primary motivation of your customer or your prospective customer? Are you actually solving a problem that they want to solve and that they're willing to spend money to solve?

If you're not, then you may need to reconsider the business entirely. That's not a question that a lot of people like to put and so they'll just say, ask for less information, but the reality is, because you have a finite amount of time on this planet, if you're going to spend it and building a business, let's build a business that's actually [00:07:00] going to move the dial for people. Let's do it in a business where you're going to be able to effect the change that people actually want and they want it so bad that they're willing to spend their hard-earned money to get it.

If you're getting to that position, number one, you're going to feel more fulfilled. Number two, you're going to make more money. Number three, you're going to have happier customers. Number four, you're going to keep them for longer periods of time. All those things add up to a great business and a great way to spend your life.

If you're not in that position, I'm going to actually invite you to try and figure out how to get to our Claim Your Life Back event we're doing in September of 2016. We do this event every year, and we may do it more frequently, but we at least do it every year and at this event, we talk about how do we get to that place where you can actually find a business that is going to address your needs and the needs of your customers.

For me, it's been very fulfilling because we've had people that we've taken that were in a business that they hated but they felt like they [00:08:00] had to be in. We've helped them move into a business that they actually love. It has changed the way that they look at their life and actually claimed their life back. That's been exciting for us. If that's match for you, I hope that you'll do that. You can actually get more information about that by texting CLAIM to 760-621-8199 and get more information about that event if that sounds like something that would help you.

At either rate, remember, it's a myth: how much data you can ask for from a contact depends on how motivated they are to solve the problem and how much they believe that you can actually help them do that. If you're tempted to reduce the amount of information that you're asking for, stop, look at your marketing, see, how well am I helping people to recognize that they have to have what I'm offering, and focus on that.

I guarantee your effort spent on focusing on getting the motivation high will way out pace dropping your barrier for entry and then having to deal with a lot more leads that really don't even want what [00:09:00] you want that are giving you just fake email addresses and all that jazz. This is Ryan Chapman from Fix Your Funnel. Keep moving forward.